In 🇬🇧 Britain, also called false acacia.

Part of legume / pea  family Fabaceae in order Fabales.

Native to central and eastern 🇺🇸 USA, although widely planted elsewhere.   ▭ 🌎︎ Map by county (🇺🇸 USA-48), ▭ 🌎︎ map (🇨🇦 Canada, 🇺🇸 USA) (colors), ▭ 🌎︎ map (North America, Central America),  Adobe Acrobat Reader file ▭ 🌎︎ today + with climate change (eastern 🇺🇸 USA).   Invasive > learn+quiz Invasive > 🌐︎ global Invasive > 🌐︎ various Invasive > 🇨🇦 Canada, 🇺🇸 USA Invasive > report it! Invasive > 🇺🇸 USA Invasive > Michigan   Native alternatives (Great Lakes green entries).  Adobe Acrobat Reader file (page 4)

Uses by native peoples
(Ethnobotany database)
  ☠︎ Toxic[?], particularly in the fruits and seeds.   On No-Plant List by Seneca Nation of Indians.  Adobe Acrobat Reader file (pages 59 and 64)

Most legumes (including this species) cooperate with a bacterium that fixes atmospheric nitrogen into a form usable by plants and animals, allowing these legumes to grow in poorer soils, or have seeds and foliage higher in protein content, than non-legumes.

Robinia hosts caterpillars of 59 species
of butterflies and moths, in some areas.
  This plant is also known to be a host for (in areas where invasive) 🐝︎ spotted lanternfly (SLF)  Lycorma delicatula.

Often grows in clonal colonies [1] —look around for other stems!

Learn more about ◼︎ black locust Robinia pseudoacacia

Management and Control (Wisconsin)  Adobe Acrobat Reader file Best Control Practices BCP (Michigan)  Adobe Acrobat Reader file Best Control Practices BCP (Ontario)  Adobe Acrobat Reader file and its Technical Bulletin  Adobe Acrobat Reader file

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