Part of ash  genus Fraxinus in ash / lilac / olive  family Oleaceae.

Native to North America's Midwest, Ohio Valley and ⛰ Appalachia.   🗺 Map by county (🇺🇸 USA-48), 🗺 map (North America, Central America),  Adobe Acrobat Reader file 🗺 today + with climate change (eastern 🇺🇸 USA).

Formerly abundant, in much of its range, this tree (and other native ash trees), with stem diameter over 2½ cm (1 in) (taller than a basketball hoop or so), have been or are now being killed by parasitic insect emerald ash borer (EAB)  Agrilus planipennis.

Although we know some homeowners, who for over a decade, protect their six adult ash trees through annual treatments.  And on a larger scale, we have heard that some communities do the same.  We have no details on this treatment, but we could find out.

Native alternatives for ash trees killed by EAB (Missouri Botanical Garden).

Uses by native peoples
(Ethnobotany database)

Like the ◼︎ white ash  Fraxinus americana, makes great baseball bats, 🔨︎ tool handles, furniture and flooring.

Fraxinus hosts caterpillars of 150 species
of butterflies and moths, in some areas.

Learn more about ◼︎ blue ash Fraxinus quadrangulata

🔍︎ 🔍︎ images Discover Life Encyclopedia of Life Michigan Flora Missouri Botanical Garden NRCS PLANTS db Wikipedia